High-Quality, Optimized Content in SEO

“Content affects everything in SEO,” Crowe said. “From your site structure and internal linking strategy to the types of links you build.”

To succeed in 2020, you will have to write something that is relevant and valuable, said Tony Wright, CEO, WrightIMC.

“This means that SEOs need to learn how to write or hire people who know how to write,” Wright said. “Google’s editorial discretion isn’t perfect yet – there will still be content that ranks that shouldn’t. But the day is coming when the best content will win.”

Make it your goal to have the best content on the web for your topic, or at least an important subset of your topic, said Eric Enge, General Manager, Perficient Digital. By doing so, you will be future-Google-proofing your business.

“This allows you to compete effectively for long-tail searches (which still remains about 70% of all search queries), will help build your site authority and demand for your content, and can be done in a directly ROI positive way,” Enge said. “In addition, this type of approach to content is exactly what Google is looking for to satisfy user needs and represents the type of market investment that Google will likely never make, because Google is about doing things with massively scalable algorithms.”

Jesse McDonald, Global SEO Strategist, IBM, and Jessica Levenson, SEO & Content Strategy Consultant, both said 2020 is the time to move away from the obsession with keywords. Stop targeting individual keywords, chasing pageviews, and “spraying and praying” with content.

McDonald said to focus more on topics.

“The goal of switching the mentality to more of a topic-focus is to create content that addresses an entire conversation holistically as opposed to just worrying about the single keyword a page should be targeting,” McDonald said.

Levenson said to adopt a deliberate and methodically organized cluster of content that delivers comprehensive and intuitive topical experiences while meeting business objectives.

“Know what answers the user needs next,” Levenson said. “Boiled down:

  • Understand who your audience is and how they search.
  • Understand the intent behind the questions they are asking or problems they need to solve.
  • Give them solutions or answers in the formats they prefer via on-point, quality, and authoritative content.
  • Execute in this fashion for every stage of their journey to create a satisfactory topical experience that serves their needs again and again.
  • Iterate because just because you do it well once doesn’t mean intent won’t change or someone else won’t do something better.”

Another thing to watch out for, according to Aja Frost, Head of Content SEO, HubSpot: content cannibalization.

“I’d recommend auditing all of your content for overlapping rankings and merging, redirecting, and archiving as needed so every page ranks for a unique set of keywords,” Frost said. “If your website covers the same topics again and again, even if you’re covering these topics from different angles, your pages are going to knock each other out of the results.”

In 2020, it’s time to take a hard look at the quality of your content – and optimizing that content for users rather than search engines, said Michelle Robbins, VP Product & Innovation, Aimclear.

“In a way, the key to staying successful in search marketing 2020 is the same as it ever was – put out good content, with consistent brand messaging, in all your channels,” Robbins said. “As the search engines become ever more adapted to natural language understanding, the best-written content – in all forms – will win the day.”

And in the world of international SEO, the time is now to invest in good localization of content, said Motoko Hunt, President, AJPR.

“Many global websites have poorly translated content that hasn’t been edited for the local tongue,” Hunt said. “It’s not the placement of the keywords, it’s about how well your content is written for the local audience.

source: https://www.searchenginejournal.com/2020-seo-trends/338697/#close

20 Years of SEO: A Brief History of Search Engine Optimization

Search engine optimization (SEO) very much revolves around Google today. However, the practice we now know as SEO actually pre-dates the world’s most popular search engine co-founded by Larry Page and Sergey Brin.

Although it could be argued that SEO and all things search engine marketing began with the launch of the first website published in 1991, or perhaps when the first web search engine launched, the story of SEO “officially” begins a bit later, around 1997.

According to Bob Heyman, author of “Digital Engagement,” we can thank none other than the manager of rock band Jefferson Starship for helping give birth to a new field that we would grow to know as “search engine optimization.”

You see, he was quite upset that the official Jefferson Starship website was ranking on Page 4 of some search engine at the time, rather than in Position 1 on Page 1.

Granted, we may never know if this tale is more revisionist history or 100 percent fact, all signs definitely point to the term SEO originating around 1997.

Do a little more hunting around and you’ll see John Audette of Multimedia Marketing Group was using the term as early as February 15, 1997.

Ranking high on search engines in 1997 was still a pretty new concept. It was also very directory driven. Before DMOZ fueled the original Google classification, LookSmart was powered by Zeal, Go.com was its own directory, and the Yahoo Directory was a major player in Yahoo Search.

If you’re unfamiliar with DMOZ, the Mozilla Open Directory Project (remember, Mozilla was a company and Moz was a brand well before SEOMoz), it was basically a Yellow Pages for websites. Which is what Yahoo was originally founded upon, the ability to find the best websites out there as approved by editors.

I started doing SEO in 1998, as a need for our clients who have built cool sites but were getting little traffic. Little did I know, it would become a lifestyle.

Then again, the World Wide Web was still a pretty new concept at the time to most people.

Today? Everybody wants to rule the search engine results pages (SERPs).

Source: https://www.searchenginejournal.com/seo-101/seo-history/#close

Numbers – A SEO Title Tag Hack

Numbers kind of pop out at you. These are examples: “5 Signs of a Zombie Apocalypse” or “How Mutants Can Save 22% on Car Insurance.”

  • Cognitive Bias – Standout specific – When you see these in SERPs, they tend to get a slightly higher click-through rate sometimes. This works because of a cognitive bias. Our brains are trained to find things that stand out and are specific. When you’re scanning search results, that’s a lot of information. So your brain is going to try to find some things that it can grasp on to, and numbers are the ultimate things that are both specific and they stand out. So sometimes, in certain circumstances, you can get a higher click-through rate by using numbers in your title tags.

Source:
https://moz.com/blog/title-tag-hacks

A Tip for SEO Optimized Blog

Do Keyword research

Now that you have set the goal of your blog post and how to evaluate its performance, it’s time to get your hands dirty and do your keyword research.

Keyword research will help you:

  • Find out which keywords to target
  • Come up with a good post title
  • Optimize your post (on-page SEO)
  • Understand user intent
  • Create SEO friendly content

These are the steps to follow:

#1 – Think about the goals and general topic for your new post.

#2 – Search Google for your general terms

#3 – Craft your post title

Source: https://www.reliablesoft.net/blog-post-seo/#tip2

How to Write the Highest-Performing AdWords Ads, Ever

Writing AdWords ads can be extremely frustrating because you need to fit all your ad copy into such a tiny space.

You have to get creative to stand out from the nine other advertisers you’re sharing real estate space with (or as few as four competitors if you’re on mobile).

So how do you do it?

I’m here to give you some proven tactics you can use to write AdWords ads that will bring you higher click-through rates, higher Quality Scores and higher conversion rates.

Mirror the visitor’s end goal

Advertisers sometimes lose sight of what their customers are truly looking for. I call this “The End Goal”: what people ultimately want to accomplish with the help of your product or service.

Use countdown timers to trigger loss aversion

Did you know that we’re more readily motivated by the idea of losing out than the idea of gaining something?

This commonly known psychological force is called loss aversion and it can be a powerful way of boosting your AdWords click-through and conversion rates.

Keep your ads current

The concept of being current and timely is pretty intuitive; what happened recently will get more eyeballs and interest than what happened three months ago.

The same is true with your AdWords ads.

Get super specific


Numbers are easy to digest and understand, and studies show that incorporating them into your copy can make it appear more accurate and credible.

Make things personal


Words like that fail to focus on the customer’s needs and can hurt your chances of getting a click – not to mention they’ve been shown to hurt conversions on landing pages, too.

Make your ads hyper-local

A lot of advertisers target more than just one city when creating their AdWords campaigns. Many even advertise nationally. Even if you offer services world-wide, you want to be welcoming to your potential customers and show them that help is right around the corner.

You may already have an 800 number that you use for all your AdWords call extensions and landing pages, or maybe even a pool of 800 numbers. But did you know that having phone numbers with geographic proximity to the visitor can double your conversion rates?

By creating geographic-specific AdWords campaigns and have your ad copy and call extensions specific to that geographic area as well.The goal here is to let your prospective customers know that you’re right around the corner, with a helping hand.

Test your heart out

With so many of your competitors worrying about 1,000 things other than writing better ads, you now have the ammunition to make your AdWords ads the most glorious ads in the world (read: the best-performing ones).

Source:

https://unbounce.com/ppc/write-high-performing-adwords-ads/

Let’s discuss TAR

Without these three elements, a business is basically a copy of its competitors, multiplying choices for prospective clients:

  • Trust
  • Authority
  • Reputation

When TAR is present, prospects become emotionally engaged, which leads to loyalty.

As for the other businesses that lack TAR, they dilute the choices, creating tougher decisions for prospects who don’t want to make tough decisions.

This concept also translates into the world of digital marketing.

Trust, authority, and reputation intertwine to create the DNA of the most successful SEO and content marketing campaigns.

Look at any first-place organic rankings, and TAR is clearly present.

For scalable online success, a sharp focus on building (and balancing) all three TAR elements is a must.

These elements increase SEO visibility because search engines crave TAR, and all that content – also designed with TAR in mind – and its higher visibility will naturally earn respect from prospects, which leads to long-term clients.

The TAR tactic to strengthen a business’s online presence is simple and straightforward. But the process of achieving true TAR in digital marketing is somewhat challenging because it’s counterintuitive to normal campaign strategies.

Before the typical keyword researchtech audits, and content calendars are created, a TAR tactic must be woven into the fabric of every campaign element.

Source: https://www.searchenginejournal.com/content-seo-trust-authority-reputation/249865/

 

Elementary writing tips for good blog posts from Yoast.com

Before anything, your blog post just has to be a good piece of writing! A lot of bloggers just begin to write when creating a new blog post. They just type what comes to mind. For some, this may be sufficient because they are natural writing talents. Others might need some help.

1. Think before you write!
2. Write down the structure of your blog post.
3. Use paragraphs.
4. Use headings.
5. Use signal words.
6. Let other people read your post.
7. Optimize the length of your article.
8. Link to previous content.
9. Add content regularly.

The era in which some SEO tricks were sufficient to get your website to rank high in Google has long ended. Nowadays, good content is king. And good content also leads to more Facebook likes and shares, tweets and return visitors to your website. Of course, you can do some extra things to maximize the SEO friendliness of your post, but most important is: just write a very, very good post!

Source: https://yoast.com/seo-friendly-blog-post/

Integrating SEO and PPC for Multi-Channel Success

PPC and SEO teams struggle to communicate with each other. They operate isolated from each other, unable to properly leverage their most important assest: first party data.

No longer are isolated search campaigns an option. The landscape is too competitive and the buyer journey is multi-faceted. Your campaigns need to think beyond isolation and move towards integration.

As mentioned, the following tactics provide a foundational way that you can take a step towards dynamic integration:

  • Using Keyword Rankings as a Signal for Dataless PPC Campaigns
  • Leveraging PPC for Content Marketing to Answer User Intent
  • Using Google Display Ads to Hack Key SEO Terms

The tactics provided here provide a brief look into the dynamic ways you can integrate your campaigns, but the execution will be key.

As Google daily takes more SERP real estate for paid advertising, PPC will play an even larger role tomorrow than today. Furthermore, as the field becomes more competitive, the CPC’s will only rise.

Source:

Integrating SEO and PPC for Multi-Channel Success

What are user signals?

User signals are behavioral patterns of users which Google uses to establish the rankings of your website in the search results. For instance: users click on a result in the search engines and after that, they immediately bounce back to Google. This is a signal that the website does not fit the search query of the user. Google uses this type of information to estimate what results are useful to show to people searching with a specific search query.

The most important user signals

The most important user signals are the bounce rate and the click-through rate (CTR). These are important for your SEO, as Google takes these seriously. But besides that, these user signals are also important for your user experience. Let’s look at these two user signals in more detail.

Bounce rate

Your bounce rate is determined by the amount of people that click on the link to your website in the search engine result pages (SERPs) and consequently click back again to Google. A high bounce rate indicates that people did not find what they were looking for on your website.

Click Through Rate (CTR)

The click through rate (CTR) of a page is determined by the number of people that click on your result in the SERPs. If your snippet is very appealing to a user, or appears in a higher position, people are more inclined to click on it. The more people click on your result (and not on the other snippets in the SERPs), the more Google will think your result does indeed fit the search query of the user best. A high CTR will therefore result in higher rankings, as Google wants to show the best result first.

Other user signals

Other examples of user signals are the time spent on a website or the percentage of users that return to your website. You can monitor those with tools like Google Analytics as well.

Source:

SEO basics: what are user signals?

 

Good headlines for good ranks

Have your headlines been doing some heavy lifting? If you’ve been using one headline to serve multiple audiences, you’re missing out on some key optimization opportunities. In today’s Whiteboard Friday, Rand gives you a process for writing headlines for SEO, for social media, and for your website visitors — each custom-tailored to its audience and optimized to meet different goals.

In the SEO world of headline writing, what I’m trying to do is rank well, earn high click-through rate, because I want a lot of those visitors to the search results to choose my result, not somebody else’s. I want low pogo-sticking. I don’t want anyone clicking the back button and choosing someone else’s result because I didn’t fulfill their needs. I need to earn links, and I’ve got to have engagement.

Read more at: https://moz.com/blog/writing-headlines-seo-social-media